Heal2022


Main Tracks and Topics

Early Identification of Hearing Loss (screening and diagnosis)
Intervention and Rehabilitation (strategies and technologies)
Hearing Loss: Mechanisms, Effects and Medical Issues
Epidemiology of Hearing Loss
Auditory Perception
Auditory Processing Disorders
Cognitive Decline and Dementia in relation to hearing loss
Listening effort and fatigue
Amplification: technologies and strategies
Cochlear Implants: state-of-the-art
Speech Perception/Speech Development
Genetic Issues
Auditory Neuropathy
e-Health and m-Health
Etiology and Medical Issues
Family Empowerment
Family Perspectives

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STRUCTURED SESSIONS PLANNED FOR THE CONFERENCE

 

SPEECH-IN-NOISE TESTING WITH DIGITS IN NOISE

Organized by Cas Smits (Amsterdam)

The DIN test (or DTT test) has become very popular test during the last decade. Initially developed as a self-test for hearing screening, it has proven to be a valid test in the clinic, for school screening and also as a standard test in audiological research. The aim of the speakers in this session is to provide the audience an overview of studies with digits in noise testing.

 

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Symposium

SENSITIVE NEW METHODS FOR MEASURING HEARING IN INFANTS, CHILDREN AND ADULTS

Organizers: David Moore and Lisa Hunter (Cincinnati, Ohio, USA)

It is now well-recognized that the audiogram doesn’t capture a lot of cases of hearing impairment (HI). This ‘hidden hearing loss’ includes, first, ‘sub-clinical hearing loss’, reflected in pure tone thresholds < 20 dB, extended high frequency (> 8 kHz) threshold elevation, or impaired supra-threshold hearing. Second, impaired spectrotemporal perception accounts for “40% of the variance in speech intelligibility, beyond the 40% accounted for by the [audiogram]” in HI (Bernstein et al., JAAA, 2013), mainly due to impaired coding of temporal fine structure (TFS) that could have its origins in both the cochlea and in the central auditory system. Third, cognitive function is undoubtedly important. Memory, attention and language certainly modulate auditory cortical processing and may also influence bottom-up HI via the auditory system’s abundant efferent pathways. Discovery of these phenomena has been based in large part on new, sensitized measures of hearing and speech perception. In this symposium, we explore examples of peripheral and central measures, focusing mainly on infants and children. Translation to clinical issues has revealed potential new solutions to fundamental problems that have puzzled both clinicians and scientists for years.

Speakers:

Yvonne Sininger (USA), New sensitive technology for auditory threshold measures in infants

Lisa Hunter (USA), Detection of slight-mild hearing levels with DPOAE and wideband tympanometry

Gabriella Musacchia (USA), Towards early identification of suprathreshold auditory deficits in infants and children

David Moore (USA), Resting state fMRI shows specific speech processing impairments in children with normal audiograms
Angela Garinis (USA), Sensitized monitoring for aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss in neonates in intensive care

Lina Motlagh-Zadeh (USA), The association between speech-in-noise perception and extended high-frequency

 

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Lecture

TRIAGE IN AUDIOLOGY - NEW INCENTIVES AND NEW EXPRESSIONS OF AN OLD BUT PERVASIVE IDEA
Mark Haggard (UK)

Professor Haggard has worked during his career on a wide range of problems involving the disciplines of audiology, psychoacoustics, psychometrics and epidemiology, including healthcare system optimisation and randomised trials.

In this lecture he shares examples of quantitatve research on the audiology of Otitis Media with Effusion in which the information acquired on affected children is oriented towards efficiency of the complete assessment/treatment system. This means not just an overall appropriate level of intervention but also the appropriate balance of considerations in selecting particular cases to receive surgical intervention, something not achieved previously in an evidence-based way.

 

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Mini-Symposium
HEARING IMPAIRMENT AND DEMENTIA: THE SENSE-COG PROJECT TO PROMOTE MENTAL WELL-BEING IN OLDER EUROPEANS

Organized by the EU SENSE-COG PROJECT

Hearing and cognitive impairments are increasingly common among older adults. Hearing impairment is a marker of risk for incident dementia, although it is unknown whether this is because hearing loss directly or indirectly contributes to cognitive decline, or whether hearing loss is a marker of neurological frailty due to common causes impacting both on hearing and cognitive function. If there is a causal contribution of hearing loss, there is an intriguing possibility to prevent or delay dementia by treating hearing loss. Alternatively, hearing loss may be an important a marker of neurological frailty signaling a need for healthy lifestyle interventions to promote cognitive health and improve mental well-being outcomes.

 

High co-morbidity of hearing and cognitive impairment is also problematic. Cognitive assessments rely on good sensory function.

Hearing impairments confound cognitive assessment and may result in over-estimation of cognitive impairment and/or misdiagnosis of hearing difficulties as cognitive impairment. Hearing impairments are extremely common among people living with dementia and are under-identified and under-treated. Hearing impairment exacerbates the impact of cognitive impairment, worsening quality of life and reducing independence for people living with dementia.

 

The EU Horizon 2020 project SENSE-cog seeks to promote mental well-being in older Europeans by addressing hearing and vision impairment. In this symposium, we will present new findings in relation to i) understanding the mechanisms underlying the association between hearing impairment and cognitive decline/dementia, ii) development and validation of cognitive assessments for people with hearing impairment and iii) development and evaluation of a sensory support intervention to improve outcomes for people with dementia.

 

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Lecture
HEARING FOR LIFE: WORLD REPORT ON HEARING

Shelly Chadha (WHO, Geneve) will present the World Report on Hearing which was developed in the last years after the adoption of the new WHO Resolution on Hearing. The Report on Hearing has been launched by the May 2020 WHO World Health Assembly (the decision-making body of WHO).

 

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Round Table 
AUDITORY PROCESSING DISORDERS
organised by the European APD Group and EFAS APD Working Group
Moderator: Vasiliki (Vivian) Iliadou (Thessaloniki, Greece)
Round Table discussion on hearing and auditory processing in the clinical audiology practice.
Panelists: Doris-Eva Bamiou (UK), Helen Grech (Malta), Tone Stokkereit Mattsson (Norway), Christos Sidiras (Greece).

Presentations:

Auditory Processing Disorders - Clinical battery as a gold standard approach, Tone Stokkereit Mattsson
Cognitive and linguistic interaction in auditory processing, Helen Grech
Auditory Rhythm Related Deficits in Primary School Children with Auditory Processing Disorders, Christos Sidiras
Clinical presentation of APD in different paediatric and adult populations, Doris-Eva Bamiou
Final discussion with attendees.

 

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Special Session on

MAKE LISTENING SAFE

Organized by Mark Laureyns and the WHO World Hearing Forum

Moderator: Mark Laureyns (Milan, Italy) and Shelly Chadha (WHO)

This session will cover research, standards, guidelines and actions to promote safe listening.  The World Hearing Forum has been established by WHO, as a global network of stakeholders promoting ear and hearing care worldwide. In this special session, you will discover the new WHO-ITU standard on Safe Listening Devices and Systems, the new ITU Safe Listening Standard for Personal Amplifiers, studies on the effectivity and the user experience of personal hearing protection, promotion campaigns to promote safe listening to young target groups, national legislations to prevent sound induced hearing loss and much more.  We also invite research groups to come and present their latest work related to safe listening.

                                                                                                                                  Last update: 31 May 2022